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Norma W. Goldman

English Grammar for Students of Latin:
The Study Guide for Those Learning Latin

3rd ed.
ISBN: 978-0-934034-34-0
Pp. 170
$19.95

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Need help learning Latin grammar?

Supplement your textbook with English Grammar for Students of Latin— learn the English grammatical terms your Latin textbook assumes you know.

You will learn: see the English Grammar for Students of Latin Table of Contents

Parts of speech — how to identify English and Latin nouns, verbs, adjectives, prepositions . . .

Question: Why learn parts of speech?

Answer to Why learn parts of speech?

So you'll choose the correct Latin equivalent
of an English word.

Example: love is amor if it’s a noun, but amātōrius if it’s an adjective.

Functions of words — how to identify English and Latin subjects, direct and indirect objects . . .

Question: Why learn the functions of words?

Answer to Why learn the functions of words?

So you'll choose the correct Latin equivalent
of an English word.

Example: girl is puella if it’s a subject, but puellam
if it’s a direct object.

Grammatical terms — explanation of English and Latin conjugation, case, declension, agreement . . .

Question: Why learn grammatical terms?

Answer to Why learn grammatical terms?

So you’ll choose the correct Latin equivalent
of an English word.

Example: "agreement" explains why the English word good has some 15 Latin equivalents depending on the word it describes.

Step-by-step analysis of examples — how to get from an English structure to an equivalent Latin structure, see Chapter 40 of the O&H Latin Study Guide

Question: Why offer a step-by-step analysis of examples?

Answer to Why offer a step-by-step analysis of examples?

So you’ll know how to get from an English structure
to a Latin structure.

Example: Whom are you giving the gifts to?
Quibus dōna dās.
(word-for-word: to whom gifts you give)